Embracing Our Humanity |

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Embracing Our Humanity

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Published Date : 2018-11-26
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Embrace the Human


By: Antonio Spadaro, SJ

INTRODUCTION TO PERSPECTIVES 01: EMBRACING OUR HUMANITY God’s embrace of creation and humanity was from the first moment of Creation, as the two Creation stories in Genesis 1 & 2 attest. God looked at Creation, including the creation of a man and a woman and said “it was good.” God’s embrace of humanity was “summed up” when the Word became Flesh (Jn. 1:14), as Justin Martyr and St Ireneas teach us. It was a “recapitulation” of God’s engagement with us and... Read More

Facing Death with Humanity and Solidarity


By: Carlo Casalone, SJ

Reading newspapers or surfing the web in the days after a recent intervention by Pope Francis on end-of-life issues, one would have found it difficult to get a clear idea of the actual content of his message. The various headlines, often on the front page, spanned a wide range from “Living Will, the Change of Francis”[1] to “Euthanasia, No Change by the Pope”[2] with many more formulations in between. Readers who went beyond the headlines would certainly have been able... Read More

Discern and Accompany: Indications from 'Amoris Laetitia'


By: Juan Carlos Scannone, SJ

Miserando atque eligendo is the motto chosen by Jorge Mario Bergoglio for his episcopal crest, and he has kept it as pope. It refers not only to the mercy of God but also to the fact that God chooses Bergoglio – just as each one of us – in a singular, personalized and personalizing way. It is the merciful love of the Father with which God loves his Son – in the terminology of Romano Guardini – as “the concrete-living person,”... Read More

Moments of Doubt


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

The first spiritual work of mercy Counseling the doubtful is a spiritual work of mercy widely attested to since the origin of Christianity.[1] It demonstrates the intellectual and wisdom dimension of the discipleship of Jesus and of the works of charity, a charity exercised in the service of truth, as recalled by Pope Benedict XVI in the encyclical Caritas in veritate. Humans thirst for truth and cannot live without it; anyone who does not find truth has a life not worth... Read More

Doubt: Threat or Opportunity?


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

An emblematic term for our era Doubt can be considered a watchword for people today. It is the premise for the construction of any solid, critical and complete thought based on reason alone without any recourse to authority or tradition that would penalize liberty or autonomy. The key philosopher of doubt is of course Descartes. According to him it is most useful because “doubt frees us from any sort of prejudice; it prepares for us an easy pathway to habituate our... Read More

Happiness: A Delightful Foretaste of Eternity


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

A universal experience that eludes definition Happiness is hard to define precisely. It has a vast array of synonyms with slightly different meanings that can take us in different directions (wellbeing, satisfaction, gratification, pleasure, joy, contentment). At the same time, people of all ages and cultures are familiar with it; happiness is understood all over the world. Those who live outside of their native country and know at least two languages give similar answers on respective questionnaires, even if the... Read More

Growing in Discernment: Aids for Growing in the Ability to Discern


By: Diego Fares

In a private meeting with Polish Jesuits in Krakow, Pope Francis said: “the Church needs to grow in discernment; in her capacity to discern.”1  He emphasized the importance of priestly formation and exhorted the Jesuits to work together with seminarians, especially by “giving them what we ourselves received from Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises: the wisdom of discernment.”2 But what is discernment? There are a lot of good theoretical definitions of it. Here I simply take it to mean the capacity of our... Read More

Sadness: Precious Teachings from this Emotion


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

An outlawed feeling Sadness is certainly not a desired or attractive feeling with its dense cluster of synonyms that are difficult to separate with any precision (boredom, angst, depression). It never has been, even if it has had a certain consideration in literary and philosophical circles (think of Spleen, the meditative or melancholic sadness, of Romanticism and decadence, or of the angst of Heidegger as the cipher of human existence) and has, in general, influenced the entire history of culture and... Read More